Wet Brain Syndrome – 10 Facts

Wet Brain Syndrome – 10 Facts

March 26, 2020 1 By Jose Scott


10 Facts to Understand About “Wet Brain” 1. Relationship to Thiamine or Vitamin B1 Alcohol interferes with the body’s ability to absorb Thiamine, or Vitamin B1, which is a complex vitamin essential to overall health. Thiamine is found in foods like whole grains, brown rice, asparagus, kale, pork, beef, chicken, eggs and potatoes. 2. Thiamine Deficiency A severe lack of thiamine can cause wet brain even in the absence of chronic alcoholism. For instance, periods of vomiting from “morning sickness” or bulimia can cause a thiamine deficiency. Even a diet solely consisting of polished white rice can cause wet brain. 3. Sudden Onset Korsakoff Syndrome has a sudden onset, and does not occur gradually. It can be brought on by a large dose of glucose in someone with a Vitamin B1 deficiency. It’s hazardous for malnourished drinkers to consume a lot of sweets and foods with no vitamins. 4. Glucose Drip This condition has been unwittingly caused by physicians administering a glucose drip to under-nourished alcoholics in their care. 5. Two Stages of Development The syndrome is generally believed to happen in two stages.
First, Wernicke’s Encephalopathy presents itself as mental confusion, staggering, and the paralysis of eye movements.
This is followed by Korsakoff’s Psychosis, which is the loss of memory function in the brain. 6. Brain Damage or Death Failure to diagnose this syndrome leads to death in 20 percent of cases, while brain damage occurs in 75 percent of cases. 7. It Can Be Reversible If Caught Early If caught early, during the Wernicke’s Encephalopathy phase, thiamine injections can sometimes reverse the damage and allow patients a full recovery. After the second stage of this condition, the injury to the brain is not reversible. 8. How is it Treated? Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome is generally treated with thiamine and abstinence from alcohol. Over time there can be some improvements, but total recovery is very unlikely. 9. How Many People Does it Affect? The National Institute of Health’s Office of Rare Diseases lists Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome as a rare disease due to the fact it affects less than 200,000 in the United States. 10. WetBrain Prevention Preventing wetbrain is a matter of limiting alcohol intake or abstaining from it all together, while maintaining a nutritional diet that includes a regular intake of Vitamin B1. Alcohol is the oldest and most widely abused drug in the world. It’s estimated that 15 million people in U.S. alone are currently struggling with alcohol abuse and dependence.

Proper treatment can help those struggling with addiction lead happy, healthy and sober lives.