Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

November 1, 2019 1 By Jose Scott


Diabetes. Diabetes is a chronic
disease in which blood sugar is not processed correctly. Insulin is a hormone designed
to control the levels of blood sugar in your body. Blood sugars can become too
high if you do not produce enough insulin or insulin
does not work properly. There are different types of
diabetes: Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body stops
making insulin. About 5 to 10% of people with
diabetes have type 1 and it is always treated with insulin. About 90 % of people
with diabetes have Type 2 and it usually affects adults. Type 2 diabetes occurs when
Insulin doesn’t work well, causing blood sugar
levels to rise. Gestational diabetes is
a temporary condition that occurs in pregnancy. If you experienced
gestational diabetes, you have a higher risk of type
2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease and should continue to
follow-up with your doctor. Pre-diabetes is a condition
in which blood sugars are higher than normal but not
high enough to fit the criteria for diabetes. Nearly half of the people
affected with pre-diabetes will develop diabetes at
some point in their lives. Signs and symptoms can include
the following: Unusual thirst, frequent urination, weight
change (gain or loss), extreme fatigue or lack of
energy, blurred vision, frequent or recurring
infections, cuts and bruises that
are slow to heal, tingling or numbness
in the hands or feet, trouble getting or
maintaining an erection. If you have any
of these symptoms, it is important to contact your
health-care provider right away. It is important to
recognize that many people who have type 2 diabetes
have no symptoms. What are some risk factors
for type 2 diabetes? Anyone over the age of 40
should be tested for diabetes every three years. Anyone who has one or
more risk factors should be tested more frequently. Having a parent, brother,
or sister with diabetes; If you are Aboriginal,
Hispanic, South Asian, Asian, or African descent; Having been
diagnosed with pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance
or impaired fasting glucose); Having high blood pressure;
Having high cholesterol or other fats in the blood;
Being overweight, especially if that weight is
mostly carried around the tummy; Having been diagnosed with
obstructive sleep apnea; Having been prescribed
a glucocorticoid medication by a doctor. If you were diagnosed with
gestational diabetes. Diabetes can lead to serious
complications and premature death but those who have
diabetes can take steps to control the disease and lower
the risk of complications. Heart and blood vessel disease,
nerve damage (neuropathy), kidney damage (nephropathy),
eye damage (retinopathy). Education: Diabetes education
is an important first step. All people with diabetes
need to be informed about their condition.
Diabetes education is free. Physical activity: Aim for
30 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity a day. Nutrition: What, when and
how much you eat all play an important role in regulating
blood glucose levels. Weight management: Maintaining
a healthy weight is especially important in the management
of type 2 diabetes. Medication: Type 1 diabetes is
always treated with insulin. Type 2 diabetes is managed
through physical activity , meal planning, medications
and/or insulin to assist your body in controlling blood
glucose more effectively. Lifestyle management: Learning
to reduce stress levels in day-to-day life can help
people with diabetes better manage their disease. Say goodbye to guilt and
consider yourself a step ahead now that you know more about
how to control this disease. Blood pressure: High blood
pressure can lead to eye disease, heart disease,
stroke and kidney disease, so people with diabetes should
try to maintain a blood pressure level at or below 130/80. To do this, you may need to
change your eating and physical activity habits and/or
take medication. For more information,
please visit our web site.