HCA Doc Minute – Hip Arthritis

HCA Doc Minute – Hip Arthritis

January 10, 2020 0 By Jose Scott


(soft music) – I’m Dr. Harry Shaia, of Ortho Virginia, and I’m an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in joint replacement and sports medicine. Oftentimes patients come to me and are complaining of symptoms that are related to hip arthritis. Those symptoms are not always obvious that they’re coming from hip arthritis. Hip arthritis is essentially when the ball and socket start lose
that normal smooth cushion that creates friction-free,
painless motion. Oftentimes patients
will come into my office and begin to complain of groin pain, or pain in that crease where their leg meets their pelvis. They’ll complain of difficulty getting up and down stairs or
getting out of a car, getting up from a seated position. Morning stiffness in
the groin and hip area. And when the arthritis
or the wearing out of that cushion begins to advance, they’ll begin to have pain with simple activities like walking. So oftentimes when a
patient first comes in, and is diagnosed with hip arthritis, hip replacement is not
the treatment of choice. We like to begin with more
conservative treatments. Such as activity modification, medications, to reduce inflammation, which is often the source
of pain from arthritis, and when we talk about
activity modification we’re talking about avoiding high impact cutting and twisting type activities. Patients who have a risk
for developing arthritis or who have been diagnosed
with early arthritis, will benefit from cardiovascular exercise that is low impact or no impact. So we focus on things like walking, swimming, cycling, elliptical,
and things of that nature. By focusing more on
those type of activities, for cardiovascular exercise, we minimize the impact on the patient’s hip arthritis and minimize
the speed with which that arthritis might progress. So for many patients,
after a period of time, simple things like
anti-inflammatory medications and activity modification
will not be enough to avoid the pain of arthritis. As arthritis advances, as that cushion wears out more and more, treatment options need
to become more invasive in order to relieve patients’ pain and to help them maintain
an active lifestyle. That’s when we begin to
talk about hip replacement. Hip replacement is a procedure that we do to remove all the
arthritis of the hip joint and replace the hip joint
with an artificial joint. So hip replacement is a
procedure where patients come into the hospital on
the day of their surgery. And we surgically remove
the arthritic ball and the arthritic socket of the hip, and we replace… We replace the ball of
the hip with a metal stem that goes down into the thigh bone, and has a metal ball that attaches to it. On the socket side, we replace the arthritic
socket with a metal shell that has a plastic
liner that fits into it. And that makes up a total hip arthroplasty or a hip replacement. Patients usually do very well
during their hip surgery, and stay in the hospital
for a day or two afterward. When they come home, they
need a little extra help, in their home, for the first
couple of days to week or so. And within a couple of
months most patients are back to their regular routine, walking for exercise or doing
those no impact activities like we talked about. Cycling, elliptical and
things of that nature. (light music)