Amputation injuries: how Potter Rees Dolan help you make a claim for compensation

Amputation injuries: how Potter Rees Dolan help you make a claim for compensation

January 13, 2020 0 By Jose Scott


I’m Richard Edwards and I’m a senior solicitor here at Potter Rees Dolan I’ve got a wide case load. Some of my clients have suffered amputations and I’m also involved with amputees in the charity sector as well So I have a fair understanding of what amputees go through So as a personal injury lawyer, my job isn’t simply to identify a defendant and obtain a judgment against them so that we can recover some compensation from them and it isn’t only to obtain the maximum award of compensation but a big part of my role is to help them with rehabilitation And by rehabilitation, what I’m talking about is as best as possible, trying to use the services of various healthcare professionals within the National Health Service and privately-sourced rehabilitation providers to, as far as possible, get the amputee back in the position that they would have been in had the accident not occured So one of the first things that I would do as the personal injury lawyer would be to engage a Case Manager and a Case Manager is a health professional who will have experience with dealing with amputees and their job would be to co-ordinate the provision of rehabilitation both in the National Health Service and privately We would also arrange for them to receive an assessment at a rehabilitation centre and the advantage of doing that privately would be to enable the amputee to access private prosthetic provision Although the National Health Service can provide access to prosthetics, an amputee will soon learn that although they can access prosthetics on the National Health Service, invariably the equipment that they can gain through the National Health Service is unfortunately inferior to what can be accessed privately So, frequently with my clients the first thing that we will be looking to do would be to access, if it’s an upper limb amputee, myoelectric prosthesis so this would be a piece of prosthetic equipment which is functional; a moving hand, a moving wrist. If it’s a lower limb amputee it would have a functional knee joint or a functional ankle joint But on top of that, the amputee can access appropriate prosthetic equipment which will be essential in ensuring that they can return to or otherwise engage in that interest So, for some of my clients I’ve been able to access prosthetic equipment that have enabled them to return to playing golf, riding a bike, go fishing, climbing, running, or anything that they might be interested in and it’s really important to engage with suitable specialist prosthetic providers to enable that equipment to be provided