Additional Insulin Injection May Reduce Heart Disease Risk in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

Additional Insulin Injection May Reduce Heart Disease Risk in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

January 13, 2020 0 By Jose Scott


Here’s the latest on Xtalks.com: A small clinical
trial has found that patients with type 1 diabetes who were given an additional insulin
injection three hours after consuming a meal may have a decreased risk of developing cardiovascular
disease. As cardiovascular diseases – including heart
attack and stroke -are the number one cause of death among patients with type 1 diabetes,
the findings could help patients better manage the condition. Hello I’m Sarah Hand, Editor and Webinar Moderator
for Xtalks.com, and welcome to this edition of Xtalks Vitals. Currently, individuals with type 1 diabetes
rely on insulin injections after meals to regulate their blood glucose levels. While the dose of insulin is calculated based
on the carbohydrate load of the meal, patients don’t take the fat content into account when
deciding how much insulin to inject. Since lipids from food are more slowly metabolized
compared to carbohydrates, they can increase blood glucose levels in the long term and
contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease. Ten men with type 1 diabetes were involved
in the small clinical trial, in which they were fed three meals: one with a low-fat content
and two meals with a high-fat content. All three meals contained the same amount
of carbohydrates and protein in order to control for their potential confounding factors on
blood glucose. Following consumption of the low-fat meal
and one of the high-fat meals, the patients self-administered insulin shots based on the
amount of carbohydrates in the meal. Three hours after eating the second high fat
meal, the study participants self-administered an additional dose of insulin that was 30
percent of the original post-prandial dose. After analyzing a series of blood samples
collected from the patients every 30 minutes until the 6-hour post-meal mark, Campbell
and his colleagues found that glucose, lipid and inflammatory marker levels were all elevated. However, after the additional insulin injection
-as with after consumption of the low-fat meal- the measured blood markers were stabilized. If future large-scale clinical trials confirm
these results, recommendations for disease management could be updated to include additional
doses of insulin. Subscribe to the Xtalks YouTube channel by
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